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IDEA Categories von Mind Map: IDEA Categories

1. 1. Autism

1.1. SUBCATEGORIES

1.1.1. Autism

1.1.2. Asperger syndrome;

1.1.3. Rett syndrome;

1.1.4. childhood disintegrative disorder; and

1.1.5. Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified

1.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

1.2.1. Learn more about the autism spectrum. Check out the research on effective instructional interventions and behavior on CPIR’s website. The organizations listed in this publication can also help.

1.2.2. Make sure directions are given step-by- step, verbally, visually, and by providing physical supports or prompts, as needed by the student. Students with autism spectrum disorders often have trouble interpreting facial expressions, body language, and tone of voice. Be as concrete and explicit as possible in your instructions and feedback to the student.

1.2.3. Find out what the student’s strengths and interests are and emphasize them. Tap into those avenues and create opportunities for success. Give positive feedback and lots of opportunities for practice.

1.2.4. Build opportunities for the student to have social and collaborative interactions throughout the regular school day. Provide support, structure, and lots of feedback.

1.2.5. If behavior is a significant issue for the student, seek help from expert professionals (including parents) to understand the meanings of the behaviors and to develop a unified, positive approach to resolving them.

1.2.6. Have consistent routines and schedules. When you know a change in routine will occur (e.g., a field trip or assembly) prepare the student by telling him or her what is going to be different and what to expect or do.

1.2.7. Work together with the student’s parents and other school personnel to create and implement an educational plan tailored to meet the student’s needs. Regularly share information about how the student is doing at school and at home.

1.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

1.3.1. AppyAutism

1.3.2. A web catalog to help find the most suitable apps for every person with autism!

1.3.3. www.appyautism.com

1.3.4. The Center for AAC and Autism

1.3.5. The Center for AAC and Autism is dedicated to building awareness of the power of augmentative and alternative communication to change the lives of children with autism and other developmental disabilities who are challenged by limited spontaneous communication skills

1.3.6. www.aacandautism.com

1.3.7. DynaVox Mayer-Johnson: Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Devices and Services

1.3.8. As the world's leading provider of AAC products and services, DynaVox offers complete solutions for individuals with speech and learning challenges. Our speech generative devices, often funded by Medicare, Medicaid or insurance, help those with conditions such as autism make meaningful connections with the world around them.

1.3.9. www.dynavoxtech.com

1.3.10. Enabling Devices

1.3.11. Enabling Devices is a company dedicated to developing affordable learning and assistive devices to help people of all ages with disabling conditions.

1.3.12. www.enablingdevices.com

1.3.13. GoTalk Pocket

1.3.14. The GoTalk Pocket is lightweight, contoured, and so small it fits nicely in your hand or your pocket! Six message keys with five levels give the user plenty to talk about. Overlays slide in easily and are stored in a removable compartment on the back. The Pocket is rugged, attractive, easy to use, and has great sound quality.

1.3.15. mayer-johnson.com

1.3.16. LAMP: Language Acquisition through Motor Planning

1.3.17. LAMP is a therapeutic approach based on neurological and motor learning principles. The goal is to give individuals who are nonverbal or have limited verbal abilities a method of independently and spontaneously expressing themselves in any setting.

1.3.18. www.aacandautism.com/lamp

1.3.19. MyVoice

1.3.20. MyVoice is an alternative and augmentative communications aide (AAC) designed to help non-verbal, low cognitive people communicate their needs and desires. It's the digital big brother of a “picture board”, a communication method that has been shown to work extremely well many non-verbal children.

1.3.21. www.discovermyvoice.com

1.3.22. Parlerai

1.3.23. Parelerai is the world's first Augmentative Collaboration (TM) service, using state-of-the-art Internet tools to enhance collaboration, bringing together the people and information needed to meet the challenges of everyday life for a child with special needs.

1.3.24. www.parlerai.com

1.3.25. Pass It On Center

1.3.26. The Pass It On Center is creating national and state resources to foster the appropriate reuse of AT so that people with disabilities can get the affordable AT they need in order to live, learn, work and play more independently.

1.3.27. www.passitoncenter.org

1.3.28. The PEBBLES Project

1.3.29. PEBBLES is a new assistive technology that is revolutionizing the educational and emotional experiences of hospital and/or homebound children. It utilizes a unique video-conferencing system known as telepresence.

1.3.30. pebblesproject.org

1.3.31. Proloquo2Go: AAC In Your Pocket

1.3.32. Proloquo2Go is a new product from AssistiveWare that provides a full-featured communication solution for people who have difficulty speaking. It brings natural sounding text-to-speech voices, up-to-date symbols, powerful automatic conjugations, a default vocabulary of over 7000 items, full expandability and extreme ease of use to the iPhone and iPod touch.

1.3.33. www.proloquo2go.com

1.3.34. SmartEdPad: A Dedicated Therapy and Intervention Tool

1.3.35. A dedicated therapy tablet for Special Education bundled with over 100s of Therapy apps approved by experienced Therapists! SmartEdPad is one-stop solution for Children with Special Needs, Special Education professionals, Therapists, SLPs who are in Special Education Space. SmartEdPad leverages the power of a mobile device and transforms special education by taking it to a whole new level! SmartEdPad can be customized to each child or group and it can be used at school, in clinics, or at home.

1.3.36. www.smartedpad.com

1.3.37. Switchamajig

1.3.38. Switchamajig products enable an iPad to control things in the physical world. They sell the Switchamajig Controller as well as unique adapted toys such as remote controlled cars and boats.

1.3.39. www.switchamajig.com

1.3.40. TapToTalk

1.3.41. Portable, customizable, affordable, socially acceptable AAC for Nintendo, iPad, iPod Touch, iPhone, Android devices and the web. Give your child a voice!

1.3.42. taptotalk.com

1.3.43. Tech4Everyone

1.3.44. A revolutionary computer station that enables people of all ages and abilities to effectively use the computer independently.

1.3.45. www.tek4everyone.com

2. 2. Deaf-Blindness

2.1. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

2.2. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

3. 3. Deafness

3.1. SUBCATEGORIES

3.1.1. Conductive hearing losses

3.1.2. Sensorineural hearing losses

3.1.3. Mixed hearing loss

3.1.4. Central hearing loss

3.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

3.2.1. regular speech, language, and auditory training from a specialist;

3.2.2. amplification systems;

3.2.3. services of an interpreter for those students who use sign language;

3.2.4. favorable seating in the class to facilitate lip reading;

3.2.5. captioned films/videos;

3.2.6. assistance of a notetaker, who takes notes for the student with a hearing loss, so that the student can fully attend to instruction;

3.2.7. instruction for the teacher and peers in alternate communication methods, such as sign language; and

3.2.8. counseling.

3.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

3.3.1. FM Systems |

3.3.2. | Induction Loop Systems

3.3.3. | One-to-One Communicators |

3.3.4. Other Hearing Assistive Technology

3.3.5. Systems Solutions

3.3.6. Cochlear Implant

4. 4. Developmental Delay

4.1. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

4.1.1. Assistive technology (devices a child might need)

4.1.2. Audiology or hearing services

4.1.3. Speech and language services

4.1.4. Counseling and training for a family

4.1.5. Medical services

4.1.6. Nursing services

4.1.7. Nutrition services

4.1.8. Occupational therapy

4.1.9. Physical therapy

4.1.10. Psychological services

4.2. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

5. 5. Emotional Disturbance

5.1. SUBCATEGORIES

5.1.1. anxiety disorders;

5.1.2. bipolar disorder (sometimes called manic-depression);

5.1.3. conduct disorders;

5.1.4. eating disorders;

5.1.5. obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); and

5.1.6. psychotic disorders.

5.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

5.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

5.4. CASE STUDY- MEGAN

6. 6. Hearing Impairment

6.1. SUBCATEGORIES

6.1.1. Conductive hearing losses

6.1.2. Sensorineural hearing losses

6.1.3. Mixed hearing loss

6.1.4. Central hearing loss

6.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

6.2.1. regular speech, language, and auditory training from a specialist;

6.2.2. amplification systems;

6.2.3. services of an interpreter for those students who use sign language;

6.2.4. favorable seating in the class to facilitate lip reading;

6.2.5. captioned films/videos;

6.2.6. assistance of a notetaker, who takes notes for the student with a hearing loss, so that the student can fully attend to instruction;

6.2.7. instruction for the teacher and peers in alternate communication methods, such as sign language; and

6.2.8. counseling.

6.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

7. 7. Intellectual Disability

7.1. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

7.1.1. Learn as much as you can about intellectual disability. The organizations listed below will help you identify techniques and strategies to support the student educationally. We’ve also listed some strategies below.

7.1.2. Recognize that you can make an enormous difference in this student’s life! Find out what the student’s strengths and interests are, and emphasize them. Create opportunities for success.

7.1.3. If you are not part of the student’s IEP team, ask for a copy of his or her IEP. The student’s educational goals will be listed there, as well as the services and classroom accommodations he or she is to receive. Talk to others in your school (e.g., special educators), as necessary. They can help you identify effective methods of teaching this student, ways to adapt the curriculum, and how to address the student’s IEP goals in your classroom.

7.1.4. Be as concrete as possible. Demonstrate what you mean rather than giving verbal directions. Rather than just relating new information verbally, show a picture. And rather than just showing a picture, provide the student with hands-on materials and experiences and the opportunity to try things out.

7.1.5. Break longer, new tasks into small steps. Demsonstrate the steps. Have the student do the steps, one at a time. Provide assistance, as necessary.

7.1.6. Give the student immediate feedback.

7.1.7. Teach the student life skills such as daily living, social skills, and occupational awareness and exploration, as appropriate. Involve the student in group activities or clubs.

7.1.8. Work together with the student’s parents and other school personnel to create and implement an IEP tailored to meet the student’s needs. Regularly share information about how the student is doing at school and at home.

7.2. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

8. 8. Multiple Disabilities

8.1. SUBCATEGORIES

8.1.1. how severe each disability is.

8.1.2. which disabilities are involved; or

8.1.3. how many disabilities a child has;

8.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

8.2.1. Know the needs, play to the strengths. Each student with multiple disabilities will have his or her own set of skills, strengths, and learning needs. Learning more about each disability of the student will be helpful in addressing those learning needs. Also find out more about the student’s strengths and interests, enthusiasms, and preferences. These can be used to motivate the student and enrich the education he or she receives. Parents are a great source of this information. So is the student!

8.2.2. Be familiar with the student’s IEP. If you have a student with multiple disabilities in your class, chances are that he or she has an individualized education program (IEP). The IEP will spell out the educational and functional goals to be worked on. You may have been part of the team that developed the IEP. If not, it’s important to be familiar with what the student’s IEP requires. Ask for a copy. Consult with administrators and other teachers, as needed, to make sure that the supports and services listed in the IEP are provided.

8.2.3. Make modifications. Students with multiple disabilities often need substantial modifications and accommodations in the classroom. This will help them access the general education curriculum at a grade-appropriate level. Find out about accommodations at:

8.2.4. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/accommodations/

8.2.5. Let the IEP team know what program supports or modifications you need. The student’s IEP can include program modifications and supports for school personnel. Read more about this at:

8.2.6. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/modifications-personnel/

8.2.7. Allow partial participation, as necessary. Partial participation means that students with multiple disabilities aren’t excluded from activities because they might not be able to complete a task fully or independently. Modifications can be made to the task itself or to how students participate.

8.2.8. Consider assistive technology (AT). AT is appropriate, even essential, for many students with multiple disabilities. Without AT, there may be many tasks they simply cannot perform or will have difficulty performing. Computers, augmentative/alternative communication systems, and communication boards are just some examples of helpful AT. Visit the Family Center on Technology and Disability to learn more about which AT devices may be useful to a given student:

8.2.9. http://www.fctd.info

8.2.10. Does the student need textbooks in another format? IDEA requires that students with print disabilities be provided with accessible instructional materials. There are many disabilities that affect a student’s ability to use print materials; does your student have one such disability? If so, visit the National AIM Center, to learn where and how to get textbooks and workbooks that your student will be able to use: http://aim.cast.org/

8.2.11. Practice and reinforce. Does your student’s disabilities affect his or her intellectual functioning? If so, he or she will be slower to learn new things and will have difficulty applying that learning in new situations. Be concrete; give lots of hands-on opportunities for learning and practice. Give feedback immediately. Repeat the learning task in different settings.

8.2.12. Support related services in the classroom. Depending on the student’s disabilities, he or she may need related services to benefit from special education. Related services may include speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, or orientation and mobility services. It’s best practice to provide these services in the classroom during the natural routine of the school, although some may be provided in other settings. Work with the related services personnel, as appropriate. Learn more about the related services your student receives or may need at:

8.2.13. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/relatedservices/

8.2.14. Address behavior issues. Behavior can be affected by having disabilities, especially a combination of disabilities. If a student’s behavior is affecting his or her learning or the learning of others, IDEA requires that behavior be addressed in the IEP. Is this a problem area for your student? Learn what the law requires and effective strategies for addressing behavior issues in our Behavior Suite:

8.2.15. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/behavior/

8.2.16. A paraprofessional in your classroom? Some students with multiple disabilities will require the support of an aide or paraprofessional. If this is so for your student, it helps to know about working with paraprofessionals. We offer a Para page, which paraprofessionals may also find useful, at:

8.2.17. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/paras/

8.2.18. Encourage the student’s independence. It’s natural to want to help a student who’s struggling to do a task single-handedly, especially when you know there’s a disability involved. But it’s important for the child to develop the skills it takes to live as independently as possible, now and in the future.

8.2.19. When the time comes, support transition planning. IDEA requires that IEP teams and students plan ahead for the student’s transition from school to the adult world. There’s a lot to know about transition planning. When the time comes for the student to begin planning, have a look at our Transition Suite:

8.2.20. http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/transitionadult/

8.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

9. Orthopaedic Impairment

9.1. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

9.1.1. Special seating arrangements to develop useful posture and movements

9.1.2. Instruction focused on development of gross and fine motor skills

9.1.3. Securing suitable augmentative communication and other assistive devices

9.1.4. Awareness of medical condition and its affect on the student (such as getting tired quickly)

9.2. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

9.2.1. Devices to Access Information: These assistive technology devices focus on aiding the student to access the educational material. These devices include: speech recognition software screen reading software augmentative and alternative communication devices (such as communication boards) academic software packages for students with disabilities

9.2.2. Devices for Positioning and Mobility: These assistive technology devices focus on helping the student participate in educational activities. These devices include: canes walkers crutches wheelchairs specialized exercise equipment specialized chairs, desks, and tables for proper posture development

10. 10. Other Health Impairment

10.1. SUBCATEGORIES

10.1.1. ADD and AH/HD

10.1.2. Diabetes

10.1.3. Epilepsy

10.1.4. Heart conditions

10.1.5. Hemophilia

10.1.6. Lead poisoning

10.1.7. Leukemia

10.1.8. Nephritis

10.1.9. Rheumatic fever

10.1.10. Sickle cell anemia

10.1.11. Tourette syndrome

10.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

10.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

11. 11. Specific Learning Disability

11.1. SUBCATEGORIES

11.1.1. dyslexia—which refers to difficulties in reading;

11.1.2. dysgraphia—which refers to difficulties in writing; and

11.1.3. dyscalcula—which refers to difficulties in math.

11.1.4. Dyspraxia - refers to difficulty with fine motor skills

11.1.5. Auditory processing disorder -difficulty with interpreting auditory info

11.1.6. Visual processing disorder - difficulty with interpreting visual info

11.1.7. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder - difficulty with concentration and focus

11.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

11.2.1. Learn as much as you can about the different types of LD. The resources and organizations listed below can help you identify specific techniques and strategies to support the student educationally.

11.2.2. Seize the opportunity to make an enormous difference in this student’s life! Find out and emphasize what the student’s strengths and interests are. Give the student positive feedback and lots of opportunities for practice.

11.2.3. Provide instruction and accommodations to address the student’s special needs. Examples:

11.2.4. breaking tasks into smaller steps, and giving directions verbally and in writing;

11.2.5. giving the student more time to finish schoolwork or take tests;

11.2.6. letting the student with reading problems use instructional materials that are accessible to those with print disabilities;

11.2.7. letting the student with listening difficulties borrow notes from a classmate or use a tape recorder; and

11.2.8. letting the student with writing difficulties use a computer with specialized software that spell checks, grammar checks, or recognizes speech.

11.2.9. Learn about the different testing modifications that can really help a student with LD show what he or she has learned.

11.2.10. Teach organizational skills, study skills, and learning strategies. These help all students but are particularly helpful to those with LD.

11.2.11. Work with the student’s parents to create an IEP tailored to meet the student’s needs.

11.2.12. Establish a positive working relationship with the student’s parents. Through regular communication, exchange information about the student’s progress at school.

11.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

11.4. CASE STUDY - ELLIE

11.5. CAST STUDY - NICK

12. 12. Speech or Language Impairment

12.1. SUBCATEGORIES

12.1.1. Articulation | speech impairments where the child produces sounds incorrectly (e.g., lisp, difficulty articulating certain sounds, such as “l” or “r”);

12.1.2. Fluency | speech impairments where a child’s flow of speech is disrupted by sounds, syllables, and words that are repeated, prolonged, or avoided and where there may be silent blocks or inappropriate inhalation, exhalation, or phonation patterns;

12.1.3. Voice | speech impairments where the child’s voice has an abnormal quality to its pitch, resonance, or loudness; and

12.1.4. Language | language impairments where the child has problems expressing needs, ideas, or information, and/or in understanding what others say. (1)

12.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

12.2.1. —Learn as much as you can about the student’s specific disability. Speech-language impairments differ considerably from one another, so it’s important to know the specific impairment and how it affects the student’s communication abilities.

12.2.2. —Recognize that you can make an enormous difference in this student’s life! Find out what the student’s strengths and interests are, and emphasize them. Create opportunities for success.

12.2.3. —If you are not part of the student’s IEP team, ask for a copy of his or her IEP. The student’s educational goals will be listed there, as well as the services and classroom accommodations he or she is to receive.

12.2.4. —Make sure that needed accommodations are provided for classwork, homework, and testing. These will help the student learn successfully.

12.2.5. —Consult with others (e.g., special educators, the SLP) who can help you identify strategies for teaching and supporting this student, ways to adapt the curriculum, and how to address the student’s IEP goals in your classroom.

12.2.6. —Find out if your state or school district has materials or resources available to help educators address the learning needs of children with speech or language impairments. It’s amazing how many do!

12.2.7. —Communicate with the student’s parents. Regularly share information about how the student is doing at school and at home.

12.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

13. 13. Traumatic Brain Imjury

13.1. SUBCATEGORIES

13.1.1. Difficulties with thinking

13.1.2. Social, behavioral, or emotional problems

13.1.3. Physical disabilities

13.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

13.2.1. Find out as much as you can about the child’s injury and his or her present needs. Find out more about TBI through the resources and organizations listed below. These can help you identify specific techniques and strategies to support the student educationally.

13.2.2. Give the student more time to finish schoolwork and tests.

13.2.3. Give directions one step at a time. For tasks with many steps, it helps to give the student written directions.

13.2.4. Show the student how to perform new tasks. Give examples to go with new ideas and concepts.

13.2.5. Have consistent routines. This helps the student know what to expect. If the routine is going to change, let the student know ahead of time.

13.2.6. Check to make sure that the student has actually learned the new skill. Give the student lots of opportunities to practice the new skill.

13.2.7. Show the student how to use an assignment book and a daily schedule. This helps the student get organized.

13.2.8. Realize that the student may get tired quickly. Let the student rest as needed. Reduce distractions.

13.2.9. Keep in touch with the student’s parents. Share information about how the student is doing at home and at school.

13.2.10. Be flexible about expectations. Be patient. Maximize the student’s chances for success.

13.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

13.3.1. Devices for Memory and Organization: These assistive technology devices focus on helping the student with memory and organization difficulties. This includes a wide range of devices: calendar boards schedule organizers voice organizers medication reminders Smartphones specialized watches PDA devices (www.biausa.org/Pages/AT/general.php) Devices to Access Information: These assistive technology devices focus on aiding the student to access the educational material. These devices include: speech recognition software screen reading software tinted overlays for reading (this may help with visual processing) academic software packages for students with disabilities Devices for Positioning and Mobility: These assistive technology devices focus on helping the student participate in educational activities. These devices include: canes crutches wheelchairs specialized beds specialized chairs, desks, and tables

14. 14. Visual Impairment, Including Blindness

14.1. SUBCATEGORIES

14.1.1. strabismus, where the eyes look in different directions and do not focus simultaneously on a single point;

14.1.2. congenital cataracts, where the lens of the eye is cloudy;

14.1.3. retinopathy of prematurity, which may occur in premature babies when the light-sensitive retina hasn’t developed sufficiently before birth;

14.1.4. retinitis pigmentosa, a rare inherited disease that slowly destroys the retina;

14.1.5. coloboma, where a portion of the structure of the eye is missing;

14.1.6. optic nerve hypoplasia, which is caused by underdeveloped fibers in the optic nerve and which affects depth perception, sensitivity to light, and acuity of vision; and

14.1.7. cortical visual impairment (CVI), which is caused by damage to the part of the brain related to vision, not to the eyes themselves.

14.2. INTERVENTION STRATEGIES

14.3. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

14.3.1. Assistive technology programs that run on off-the-shelf computers can speak the text on the screen or magnify the text in a word processor, web browser, e-mail program or other application

14.3.2. Stand-alone products designed specifically for people who are blind or visually impaired, including personal digital assistants (PDAs) and electronic book players provide portable access to books, phone numbers, appointment calendars, and more.

14.3.3. Optical character recognition systems scan printed material and speak the text. Braille embossers turn text files into hard-copy braille.