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Maturity Models von Mind Map: Maturity Models

1. Forrester

1.1. IT Governance Maturity Model

1.2. Information Security Maturity Model

2. Berenschot

2.1. Project Excellence Model® (PEM)

2.1.1. Date: 2003

2.1.2. Derived from EFQM / INK model

2.1.2.1. EFQM / INK model is suitable for traditional organizations but not for project organizations.

2.1.2.2. Berenschot adapted the EFQM / INK model to a model that is appropriate for project organizations.

2.1.3. PEM consists of 12 key areas that are divided over:

2.1.3.1. organization area

2.1.3.1.1. consist of critical success factors (CSFs) in the project organization

2.1.3.2. results area

2.1.3.2.1. consist of project success criteria

2.1.4. PEM consists of 2 types of result areas:

2.1.4.1. narrow (easy tangible and measurable elements)

2.1.4.1.1. ‘classic’ areas like time, costs and quality

2.1.4.2. broad (contain elements that can not be translated so easily in measurable terms)

2.1.4.2.1. client

2.1.4.2.2. project personnel

2.1.4.2.3. contracting partners

2.1.4.2.4. users

2.1.4.2.5. stakeholders

3. AXELOS

3.1. Relationships between P2MM, P1M3, P2M3, P3M3.

3.2. PRINCE2® Maturity Model (P2MM)

3.2.1. PRINCE2® Maturity Model (P2MM)

3.2.1.1. http://www.p3m3-officialsite.com/nmsruntime/saveasdialog.aspx?lID=462&sID=210

3.2.2. PRINCE2® Maturity Model (P2MM) Self-Assessment

3.2.2.1. http://www.p3m3-officialsite.com/nmsruntime/saveasdialog.aspx?lID=469&sID=210

3.2.3. Derived from P3M3®

3.2.4. Dedicated to PRINCE2®

3.3. Project Management Maturity Model (P1M3)

3.3.1. Since P2MM is focused specifically on the PRINCE2 project management method and therefore this model is only applicable to organizations that use the PRINCE2 method. In order to overcome this problem the Project Management Maturity Model (P1M3) is developed which is an abstraction of P2MM.

3.3.2. Abstraction of P2MM. P1M3 is, unlike P2MM, method independent and can be applied in any organization and is not only restricted to organizations where PRINCE2 is used as is the case with P2MM.

3.3.3. P1M3 is restricted to project management.

3.4. Project and Programme Management Maturity Model (P2M3)

3.4.1. P2M3 is an extension of P1M3.

3.4.2. Supports project and programme management.

3.5. Portfolio, Programme, Project Management Maturity Model (P3M3®)

3.5.1. P3M3 is an extension of P2M3 and P2MM.

3.5.2. v1 was published in 2006.

3.5.3. v2 was published in 2008.

3.5.4. Official website

3.5.4.1. http://www.p3m3-officialsite.com/

3.5.5. P3M3® Introduction and Guide

3.5.5.1. http://www.p3m3-officialsite.com/nmsruntime/saveasdialog.aspx?lID=456&sID=235

3.5.6. Viewed independently for:

3.5.6.1. Portfolio (PfM3)

3.5.6.1.1. http://www.p3m3-officialsite.com/nmsruntime/saveasdialog.aspx?lID=457&sID=210

3.5.6.1.2. P3M3® Portfolio Management Self-Assessment

3.5.6.2. Programme (PgM3)

3.5.6.2.1. http://www.p3m3-officialsite.com/nmsruntime/saveasdialog.aspx?lID=464&sID=210

3.5.6.2.2. P3M3® Programme Management Self-Assessment

3.5.6.3. Project (PjM3)

3.5.6.3.1. http://www.p3m3-officialsite.com/nmsruntime/saveasdialog.aspx?lID=458&sID=210

3.5.6.3.2. P3M3® Project Management Self-Assessment

3.5.7. 5 Levels of maturity

3.5.7.1. Level 1 - Awareness of process

3.5.7.2. Level 2 - Repeatable process

3.5.7.3. Level 3 - Defined process

3.5.7.4. Level 4 - Managed process

3.5.7.5. Level 5 - Optimised process

3.5.8. 7 Perspectives

3.5.8.1. Management Control

3.5.8.2. Benefits Management

3.5.8.3. Finance Management

3.5.8.4. Risk Management

3.5.8.5. Organisation Improvement

3.5.8.6. Organisation Governance

3.5.8.7. Resources

3.5.8.8. Each perspective describes the processes and practices that should be deployed at each level of maturity

3.5.8.9. Perspectivs group together a range of key characteristics

3.5.9. 5 Common attributes

3.5.9.1. Planning effectively

3.5.9.2. Stakeholder involvement

3.5.9.3. Information & Configuration Management

3.5.9.4. Quality

3.5.9.5. Capability building

3.5.9.6. Common attributes are themes that are common in each perspective and can be found at each level

3.5.10. Watch: P3M3® Self Assessment Tool

3.6. Management of Value (MoV®) Maturity Model

3.6.1. Derived from P3M3®

3.6.1.1. as stated in official publication:

3.6.1.1.1. "The MoV maturity model mimics the P3M3 structure outlined in Figure D.1."

3.6.2. 5 Levels of maturity

3.6.2.1. Level 1 – Awareness process

3.6.2.2. Level 2 – Repeatable process

3.6.2.3. Level 3 – Defined process

3.6.2.4. Level 4 – Managed process

3.6.2.5. Level 5 – Optimized process

3.7. Management of Risk (M_o_R®) Maturity Model

3.7.1. Derived from P3M3®

3.7.2. 5 Levels of maturity

3.7.2.1. Level 1: Initial

3.7.2.2. Level 2: Repeatable

3.7.2.3. Level 3: Defined

3.7.2.4. Level 4: Managed

3.7.2.5. Level 5: Optimised

3.8. Portfolio, Programme, Project (P3O®) Offices Maturity Model

3.8.1. Derived from P3M3®

3.8.1.1. as stated in official publication:

3.8.1.1.1. "P3M3 provides a very useful input into the development of a P3O blueprint in terms of current and target portfolio, programme and project management capabilities."

3.9. ITIL® Maturity Model

3.9.1. http://www.axelos.com/gempdf/ITIL_Maturity_Model_v1_2W.pdf

3.9.2. Maturity level definitions are aligned with COBIT® and CMMI® definitions

3.9.3. 5 Levels of maturity

3.9.3.1. Level 1: Initial

3.9.3.2. Level 2: Repeatable

3.9.3.3. Level 3: Defined

3.9.3.4. Level 4: Managed

3.9.3.5. Level 5: Optimized

4. PMI

4.1. Organizational Project Management Maturity Model (OPM3®)

4.1.1. 4 Levels of maturity

4.1.1.1. Level 1: Standardize

4.1.1.2. Level 2: Measure

4.1.1.3. Level 3: Control

4.1.1.4. Level 4: Continually Improve

4.1.2. official website

4.1.2.1. http://opm3online.pmi.org/

5. Software Engineering Institute (SEI)

5.1. Capability Maturity Model (CMM)

5.1.1. http://www.sei.cmu.edu/cmmi/

5.1.2. The ‘parent’ / ‘grandfather‘ of the majority of maturity models is the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) published by the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) based at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, US in 1986.

5.1.3. 5 Levels of maturity

5.1.3.1. Level 1: Initial

5.1.3.1.1. Processes are ad-hoc, chaotic, or actually few processes are defined.

5.1.3.2. Level 2: Repeatable

5.1.3.2.1. Basic processes are established and there is a level of discipline to stick to these processes.

5.1.3.3. Level 3: Defined

5.1.3.3.1. All processes are defined, documented, standardized and integrated into each other.

5.1.3.4. Level 4: Managed

5.1.3.4.1. Processes are measured by collecting detailed data on the processes and their quality.

5.1.3.5. Level 5: Optimising

5.1.3.5.1. Continuous process improvement is adopted and in place by quantitative feedback and from piloting new ideas and technologies.

5.2. Capability Maturity Model Integrated (CMMI)

6. ITSMF

6.1. IT Service Management Capability Maturity Model (ITSM-CMM)

6.1.1. aligned to ITIL®

7. Harold Kerzner

7.1. Kerzner Project Management Maturity Model (KPM3 or K-PMMM)

7.1.1. https://www.iil.com/kpm3/

7.1.2. 5 Levels of maturity

7.1.2.1. Level 1: Common Language

7.1.2.2. Level 2: Common Process

7.1.2.3. Level 3: Singular Methodology

7.1.2.4. Level 4: Benchamarking

7.1.2.5. Level 5: Continuous Improvement

8. Gartner

8.1. Gartner, Program and Portfolio Management (PPM) Maturity Model

8.2. Web Analytics Maturity Model

8.2.1. 5 Levels of maturity

9. PMO Tools

9.1. The PMO Maturity Cube

9.1.1. http://pmotools.org/pmocube/index.php/homeController

9.1.2. 3 Maturity Models

9.1.2.1. Service: A.1.7 - Managing one or more portfolios (Scope: Enterprise/Approach: Strategic)

9.1.2.1.1. Level 0: The PMO does not provide this service.

9.1.2.1.2. Level 1: The PMO maintains a list of active projects throughout the organization.

9.1.2.1.3. Level 2: The PMO maintains a list of active projects and programs throughout the organization and establishes their prioritization but does not follow a structured portfolio management process.

9.1.2.1.4. Level 3: The PMO maintains a list of active projects and portfolios, prioritizes them throughout the organization, and establishes formal processes, acting as facilitator in the definition (identification, categorization, evaluation, selection), development (prioritize, balance and commitment) and implementation (monitoring, review and change management) of the portfolio.

9.1.2.1.5. Level 4: The PMO maintains a list of active projects and portfolios, prioritizes them throughout the organization, and establishes formal processes, acting as facilitator in the definition (identification, categorization, evaluation, selection), development (prioritize, balance and commitment) and implementation (monitoring, review and change management) of the portfolio. The PMO uses an integrated system to automate the organization's portfolio management process.

9.1.2.2. Service: A.2.1 - Develop and implement the project management methodology (Scope: Enterprise/Approach: Tactical)

9.1.2.2.1. Level 0: The PMO does not provide this service.

9.1.2.2.2. Level 1: The PMO has developed a basic methodology for the organization, but it is not used consistently on all projects.

9.1.2.2.3. Level 2: The PMO has developed a standard methodology for the organization, aligning possible existing methodologies in different areas, and the methodology used in most projects in the organization.

9.1.2.2.4. Level 3: The PMO has developed a standard methodology for the organization, and it is used by all projects as it is mandatory unless a specific waiver is requested and approved.

9.1.2.2.5. Level 4: The PMO has developed and improved the standard methodology for the organization focusing on best practices and continuous improvement.

9.1.2.3. Service: A.3.3 - Monitor and control project /program performance (Scope: Enterprise/Approach: Operational)

9.1.2.3.1. Level 0: The PMO does not provide this service.

9.1.2.3.2. Level 1: The PMO monitors and controls the project /program performance considering time, cost, quality and customer satisfaction and provides follow-up reports without analysis upon request.

9.1.2.3.3. Level 2: The PMO monitors and controls the project /program performance considering time, cost, quality, and customer satisfaction and analyzes the available data.

9.1.2.3.4. Level 3: The PMO monitors and controls the project /program performance considering time, cost, quality, and customer satisfaction, analyzes data, and takes preventive and corrective actions working proactively with project /program manager and senior management.

10. PM Solutions

10.1. PM Solutions’ Project Management Maturity Model (PMS-PMMM)

10.1.1. Follows the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) Capability Maturity Model's (CMM®)

10.1.2. Examines maturity development across ten knowledge areas in the Project Management Institute's (PMI®) A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)

10.1.3. http://www.pmsolutions.com/resources/view/what-is-the-project-management-maturity-model/

10.1.4. 5 Levels of maturity

10.1.4.1. Level 1: Initial process

10.1.4.2. Level 2: Structured process and standards

10.1.4.3. Level 3: Organizational standards and institutionalized process

10.1.4.4. Level 4: Managed process

10.1.4.5. Level 5: Optimizing process

10.2. PM Solutions’ Project Portfolio Management Maturity Model (PMS-PPMMM)

10.2.1. 5 Levels of maturity

10.2.1.1. Level 1: Initial process

10.2.1.2. Level 2: Structured process and standards

10.2.1.3. Level 3: Organizational standards and institutionalized process

10.2.1.4. Level 4: Managed process

10.2.1.5. Level 5: Optimizing process

11. Sun Microsystems

11.1. Information Lifecycle Management (ILM) Maturity Model

11.1.1. 5 Levels of maturity

11.1.1.1. Level 1: Chaotic

11.1.1.2. Level 2: Reactive

11.1.1.3. Level 3: Proactive

11.1.1.4. Level 4: Optimized

11.1.1.5. Level 5: Self-aware

12. Oracle

12.1. Oracle SOA Maturity Model

12.1.1. 6 Levels of maturity

12.1.1.1. Level 0: No SOA

12.1.1.1.1. There is no SOA approach being taken. SOA is not underway.

12.1.1.2. Level 1: Ad Hoc

12.1.1.2.1. Awareness of SOA exists and some groups are embarking on building services. There is no SOA plan being followed.

12.1.1.3. Level 2: Opportunistic

12.1.1.3.1. An approach has been decided upon and is being opportunistically applied. The approach has not been widely accepted nor adopted. It may be informally defined, or if documented, may exist primarily as “shelf ware”.

12.1.1.4. Level 3: Systematic

12.1.1.4.1. The approach has been reviewed and accepted by affected parties. There has been buy-in to the documented approach and the approach is always (or nearly always) followed.

12.1.1.5. Level 4: Managed

12.1.1.5.1. The capability is being measured and quantitatively managed via some type of governance structure. Appropriate metrics are being gathered and reported.

12.1.1.6. Level 5: Optimized

12.1.1.6.1. Metrics are being consistently gathered and are being used to incrementally improve the capability. Assets are proactively maintained to ensure relevancy and correctness.

12.2. Oracle Cloud Computing Maturity Model

12.2.1. 6 Levels of maturity

12.2.1.1. Level 0: None

12.2.1.1.1. There is no Cloud approach being taken. No elements of Cloud are being implemented.

12.2.1.2. Level 1: Ad Hoc

12.2.1.2.1. Awareness of Cloud Computing is established and some groups are beginning to implement elements of Cloud Computing. There is no cohesive Cloud Computing plan being followed.

12.2.1.3. Level 2: Opportunistic

12.2.1.3.1. An approach has been decided upon and is being opportunistically applied. The approach has not been widely accepted and redundant or overlapping approaches exist. It may be informally defined, or if documented, may exist primarily as “shelf ware”.

12.2.1.4. Level 3: Systematic

12.2.1.4.1. The approach has been reviewed and accepted by affected parties. There has been buy-in to the documented approach and the approach is always (or nearly always) followed.

12.2.1.5. Level 4: Managed

12.2.1.5.1. The capability is being measured and quantitatively managed via some type of governance structure. Appropriate metrics are being gathered and reported.

12.2.1.6. Level 5: Optimized

12.2.1.6.1. Metrics are being consistently gathered and are being used to incrementally improve the capability. Assets are proactively maintained to ensure relevancy and correctness. The potential for market mechanisms to be used to leverage inter-cloud operations has been established.

12.3. Oracle Master Data Management (MDM) Maturity Model

12.3.1. 4 Levels of maturity

12.3.1.1. Level 1: Marginal

12.3.1.2. Level 2: Stable

12.3.1.3. Level 3: BestPractice

12.3.1.4. Level 4: Transformational

13. The Open Group

13.1. Open Group Service Integration Maturity Model (OSIMM)

13.1.1. 7 Levels of maturity

13.1.1.1. Level 1: Silo

13.1.1.2. Level 2: Integrated

13.1.1.3. Level 3: Componentized

13.1.1.4. Level 4: Service

13.1.1.5. Level 5: Composite Services

13.1.1.6. Level 6: Virtualized Services

13.1.1.7. Level 7: Dynamically Re-Configurable Services

13.1.2. official website

13.1.2.1. http://www.opengroup.org/soa/source-book/osimmv2/

13.2. Open Information Security Management Maturity Model (O-ISM3)

13.2.1. 5 Levels of maturity

13.2.1.1. Level 1: Initial

13.2.1.2. Level 2: Managed

13.2.1.3. Level 3: Defined

13.2.1.4. Level 4: Controlled

13.2.1.5. Level 5: Optimized

13.2.2. official website

13.2.2.1. http://www.ism3.com/

13.2.3. official publication

13.2.3.1. https://www2.opengroup.org/ogsys/jsp/publications/PublicationDetails.jsp?publicationid=12238

14. Digital Asset Management

14.1. DAM Maturity Model (DAM3)

14.1.1. 5 Levels of maturity

14.1.1.1. Level 1: Ad Hoc

14.1.1.1.1. Exposure to the application of DAM technologies, including managing repositories and workflow systems.

14.1.1.2. Level 2: Incipient

14.1.1.2.1. Casual understanding of DAM technologies, often starting in the form of content management systems and centralised document repositories.

14.1.1.3. Level 3: Formative

14.1.1.3.1. Demonstrated experience with implementation of named DAM systems and core competencies, such as ingestion, cataloging, transformation, transcoding, distribution, etc.

14.1.1.4. Level 4: Operational

14.1.1.4.1. Managing repositories and workflow systems is core to IT with organised knowledge transfer.

14.1.1.5. Level 5: Optimal

14.1.1.5.1. Understanding and participating in forecasting enterprise DAM needs in preparation of future business requirements.

15. RIMS

15.1. RIMS Risk Maturity Model for Enterprise Risk Management

15.1.1. 5 Levels of maturity

15.1.1.1. Level 1: Ad Hoc

15.1.1.2. Level 2: Initial

15.1.1.3. Level 3: Repeatable

15.1.1.4. Level 4: Managed

15.1.1.5. Level 5: Leadership

16. MINCE2 Foundation

16.1. Maturity INcrements IN Controlled Environments (MINCE)

16.1.1. http://www.mince2.com/

16.1.2. http://www.mince2.org/

16.1.3. 5 Levels of maturity

16.1.3.1. Level 1: Activities

16.1.3.2. Level 2: Processes

16.1.3.3. Level 3: Systems

16.1.3.4. Level 4: Supply Chain

16.1.3.5. Level 5: Quality

16.1.3.6. Levels are derived form EFQM Excellence Model.

16.1.4. Tower I: People

16.1.5. Tower II: Methods and techniques

16.1.6. Tower III: Customer

16.1.7. Tower IV: Realization

16.1.8. Tower V: Knowledge

16.1.9. Tower VI: Supporting services

17. European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM)

17.1. EFQM Excellence Model (aka. INK model, “Instituut voor Nederlandse Kwaliteit")

18. Information Security

18.1. Security Awareness Maturity Model

18.1.1. 5 Levels of maturity

18.1.1.1. Level 1: Non-Existant Program

18.1.1.2. Level 2: Compliance Focused

18.1.1.3. Level 3: Promoting Awareness & Change

18.1.1.4. Level 4: Long Term Sustainment

18.1.1.5. Level 5: Metrics

18.1.2. http://www.securingthehuman.org/blog/2012/05/22/security-awareness-maturity-model

18.1.3. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qopLSlEYv9Q&list=UUYzwGkfOqrevO-4TuTjPLwQ

18.2. Information Security Management Maturity Model (aka. ISM-cubed or ISM3)

18.2.1. http://www.lean.org/FuseTalk/Forum/Attachments/ISM3_v2.00-HandBook.pdf

18.3. "Pragmatic Security Metrics – Applying Metametrics to Information Security" - Brotby & Hinson, 2013 p. 47

18.3.1. 5 Levels of maturity

18.3.1.1. Level 1: Ad hoc

18.3.1.1.1. Information security risks are handled on an entirely informational basis. Processes are undocumented and relatively unstable.

18.3.1.2. Level 2: Repeatable but intuitive

18.3.1.2.1. There is an emerging appreciation of information security. Security processes are not formally documented, depending largely on employee’s knowledge and experience.

18.3.1.3. Level 3: Defined process

18.3.1.3.1. Information security activities are formalized throughout the organization using policies, procedures, and security awareness.

18.3.1.4. Level 4: Managed and measurable

18.3.1.4.1. Information security activities are standardized using policies, procedures, defined and assigned roles and responsibilities, etc., and metrics are introduced for routing security operations and management purposes.

18.3.1.5. Level 5: Optimized

18.3.1.5.1. Metrics are used to drive systematic information security improvements, including strategic activities.

19. ASL BiSL Foundation

19.1. BiSL® Maturity Model

19.1.1. 5 Levels of maturity

19.1.1.1. Level 1: Initial

19.1.1.1.1. The organization does not have a stable environment in which Business Information Management processes are executed. There are however some attempts and sometimes activities are executed in order to acquire insight and knowledge. The results and the outcomes of the activities are usually unpredictable.

19.1.1.2. Level 2: Repeatable

19.1.1.2.1. The organization executes activities repetitively. Previous experience and ways of working are used for the execution of activities. Signs of a standard way of working are appearing.

19.1.1.3. Level 3: Defined and managed

19.1.1.3.1. The activities and processes are defined and documented. The processes have been well thought through. The processes have also been designed and implemented to provide quantitative and qualitative indicators that the organization can use for control and adjustment.

19.1.1.4. Level 4: Optimizing

19.1.1.4.1. The organization is characterized by continual process improvement. Mechanisms and processes have been developed to enable ongoing and controlled improvements to the process.

19.1.1.5. Level 5: Chain

19.1.1.5.1. The focus of the organization during the design and implementation, the improvement, and the mutual adjustment of processes all focus on increasing the added value within the process chain in which they participate.

19.2. ASL®2 Maturity Model

19.2.1. 5 Levels of maturity

19.2.1.1. Level 1: Initial

19.2.1.1.1. The organization does not have a stable environment in which Business Information Management processes are executed. There are however some attempts and sometimes activities are executed in order to acquire insight and knowledge. The results and the outcomes of the activities are usually unpredictable.

19.2.1.2. Level 2: Repeatable

19.2.1.2.1. The organization executes activities repetitively. Previous experience and ways of working are used for the execution of activities. Signs of a standard way of working are appearing.

19.2.1.3. Level 3: Defined and managed

19.2.1.3.1. The activities and processes are defined and documented. The processes have been well thought through. The processes have also been designed and implemented to provide quantitative and qualitative indicators that the organization can use for control and adjustment.

19.2.1.4. Level 4: Optimizing

19.2.1.4.1. The organization is characterized by continual process improvement. Mechanisms and processes have been developed to enable ongoing and controlled improvements to the process.

19.2.1.5. Level 5: Chain

19.2.1.5.1. The focus of the organization during the design and implementation, the improvement, and the mutual adjustment of processes all focus on increasing the added value within the process chain in which they participate.

20. Pink Elephant

20.1. ITIL Process Maturity

20.1.1. 6 Levels of maturity

20.1.1.1. Level 0: Absence

20.1.1.1.1. “There is absolutely no evidence of any activities supporting the process”

20.1.1.2. Level 1: Initiation

20.1.1.2.1. “There are ad-hoc activities present, but we are not aware of how they relate to each other within a single process”

20.1.1.3. Level 2: Awerness

20.1.1.3.1. “We are aware of the process but some activities are still incomplete or inconsistent; there is no overall measuring or control”

20.1.1.4. Level 3: Control

20.1.1.4.1. “The process is well defined, understood and implemented”

20.1.1.5. Level 4 Integration

20.1.1.5.1. “Inputs from this process come from other well controlled processes; outputs from this process go to other well controlled processes”

20.1.1.6. Level 5 Optimization

20.1.1.6.1. “This process drives quality improvements and new business opportunities beyond the process”

20.1.2. http://www.pinkelephant.com/DocumentLibrary/UploadedContents/PinkLinkArticles/ITIL%20Process%20Maturity.pdf

21. University of California (Berkeley)

21.1. Project Management Process Maturity (PM)2 Model

21.1.1. http://www.ce.berkeley.edu/~ibbs/yhkwak/pmmaturity.html

21.1.2. 5 Levels of maturity

21.1.2.1. Level 1: Ad-hoc

21.1.2.1.1. No PM processes or practices are consistently available

21.1.2.1.2. No PM data are consistently collected or analyzed

21.1.2.1.3. Functionally isolated

21.1.2.1.4. Lack of senior management support

21.1.2.1.5. Project success depends on individual efforts

21.1.2.2. Level 2: Planned

21.1.2.2.1. Informal PM processes are defined

21.1.2.2.2. Informal PM problems are identified

21.1.2.2.3. Informal PM data are collected

21.1.2.2.4. Team oriented ~weak!

21.1.2.2.5. Organizations possess strengths in doing similar work

21.1.2.3. Level 3: Managed at project level

21.1.2.3.1. Formal project planning and control systems are

21.1.2.3.2. managed

21.1.2.3.3. Formal PM data are managed

21.1.2.3.4. Team oriented ~medium!

21.1.2.3.5. Informal training of PM skills and practices

21.1.2.4. Level 4: Managed at corporate level

21.1.2.4.1. Multiple PM ~program management!

21.1.2.4.2. PM data and processes are integrated

21.1.2.4.3. PM processes data are quantitatively analyzed,

21.1.2.4.4. measured, and stored

21.1.2.4.5. Strong teamwork

21.1.2.4.6. Formal PM training for project team

21.1.2.5. Level 5: Continuous learning

21.1.2.5.1. PM processes are continuously improved

21.1.2.5.2. PM processes are fully understood

21.1.2.5.3. PM data are optimized and sustained

21.1.2.5.4. Project-driven organization

21.1.2.5.5. Dynamic, energetic, and fluid organization

21.1.2.5.6. Continuous improvement of PM processes and practices

21.1.3. Date: 2002

21.1.4. Authors:

21.1.4.1. Young Hoon Kwak, Ph.D

21.1.4.2. C. William Ibbs, Ph.D

22. OMG

22.1. Business Process Maturity Model (BPMM)

22.1.1. 5 Levels of maturity

22.1.1.1. Level 1: Initial

22.1.1.2. Level 2: Managed

22.1.1.3. Level 3: Standardized

22.1.1.4. Level 4: Predictable

22.1.1.5. Level 5: Innovating

23. Search Enginuity

23.1. SEO Maturity Model

23.1.1. 5 Stages of maturity

23.1.1.1. Stage 1: Initial / Ad-hoc

23.1.1.2. Stage 2: Repeatable

23.1.1.3. Stage 3: Defined

23.1.1.4. Stage 4: Managed & Measured

23.1.1.5. Stage 5: Optimized

24. ION Interactive

24.1. Search Marketing Maturity Model

24.1.1. 5 Levels of maturity

24.1.1.1. Level 1: Ad hoc

24.1.1.1.1. No management, no budget, no real structure.

24.1.1.2. Level 2: Engaged

24.1.1.2.1. Some executive awareness, basic keyword research, limited testing of landing pages.

24.1.1.3. Level 3: Structured

24.1.1.3.1. Actual budget, management responsibility, more detailed keyword research, some competitive research/insight.

24.1.1.4. Level 4: Managed

24.1.1.4.1. Active executive participation, daily management, professional bid management of keywords, competitive benchmarking.

24.1.1.5. Level 5: Optimized

24.1.1.5.1. Strategic executive participation, significant budget, integrated multi-channel analytics, segmentation of audiences etc.

25. This freeware, non-commercial mind map was carefully hand crafted with passion and love for learning and constant improvement ... (please share, like and give feedback - your feedback and comments are my main motivation for further elaboration. THX!)

25.1. Questions / issues / errors? What do you think about my work? Your comments are highly appreciated. Please don't hesitate to contact me for :-) Mirosław Dąbrowski, Poland/Warsaw.

25.1.1. http://www.miroslawdabrowski.com

25.1.2. http://www.linkedin.com/in/miroslawdabrowski

25.1.3. https://www.google.com/+MiroslawDabrowski

25.1.4. https://play.spotify.com/user/miroslawdabrowski/

25.1.5. https://twitter.com/mirodabrowski

25.1.6. miroslaw_dabrowski

26. TMMi Foundation

26.1. Testing Maturity Model (TMM)

26.1.1. 5 Levels of maturity

26.1.1.1. Level 1: Initial

26.1.1.2. Level 2: Definition

26.1.1.3. Level 3: Integration

26.1.1.4. Level 4: Management and measurement

26.1.1.5. Level 5: Optimisation

27. Martin Hopkinson

27.1. The Project Risk Maturity Model (RMM)

27.1.1. 4 Levels of maturity

27.1.1.1. Level 1: Naïve

27.1.1.1.1. Although a project risk management process may have been initiated, its design or application is fundamentally flawed. At this level, it is likely that the process does not add value.

27.1.1.2. Level 2: Novice

27.1.1.2.1. The project risk management process influences decisions taken by the project team in a way that is likely to lead to improvements in project performance as measured against its objectives. However, although the process may add value, weaknesses with either the process design or its implementation result in significant benefits being unrealised.

27.1.1.3. Level 3: Normalised

27.1.1.3.1. The project risk management process is formalised and implemented systematically. Value is added by implementing effective management responses to significant sources of uncertainty that could affect the achievement of project objectives.

27.1.1.4. Level 4: Natural

27.1.1.4.1. The risk management process leads to the selection of risk-efficient strategic choices when setting project objectives and choosing between options for project solutions or delivery. Sources of uncertainty that could affect the achievement of project objectives are managed systematically within the context of a team culture conducive to optimising project outcomes.